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For your high-risk patients, and for everyone counting on them, add Repatha®.


Repatha® added to a statin is proven to reduce the risk of another MI.1

HE COUNTS ON YOU. Because they count on him.

For your high-risk patients, and for everyone counting on them, add Repatha®.


Repatha® added to a statin is proven to reduce the risk of another MI.1

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MI=myocardial infarction.

Reference: 1. Repatha® (evolocumab) prescribing information, Amgen.

Important Safety Information

Contraindication: Repatha® is contraindicated in patients with a history of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to Repatha®. Serious hypersensitivity reactions including angioedema have occurred in patients treated with Repatha®.

Allergic Reactions: Hypersensitivity reactions (e.g. angioedema, rash, urticaria) have been reported in patients treated with Repatha®, including some that led to discontinuation of therapy. If signs or symptoms of serious allergic reactions occur, discontinue treatment with Repatha®, treat according to the standard of care, and monitor until signs and symptoms resolve.

Adverse Reactions in Primary Hyperlipidemia (including HeFH): The most common adverse reactions (>5% of patients treated with Repatha® and occurring more frequently than placebo) were: nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection, influenza, back pain, and injection site reactions.

From a pool of the 52‐week trial and seven 12‐week trials: Local injection site reactions occurred in 3.2% and 3.0% of Repatha®‐treated and placebo‐treated patients, respectively. The most common injection site reactions were erythema, pain, and bruising.

Allergic reactions occurred in 5.1% and 4.7% of Repatha®‐treated and placebo‐treated patients, respectively. The most common allergic reactions were rash (1.0% versus 0.5% for Repatha® and placebo, respectively), eczema (0.4% versus 0.2%), erythema (0.4% versus 0.2%), and urticaria (0.4% versus 0.1%).

Adverse Reactions in the Cardiovascular Outcomes Trial: The most common adverse reactions (>5% of patients treated with Repatha® and occurring more frequently than placebo) were: diabetes mellitus (8.8% Repatha®, 8.2% placebo), nasopharyngitis (7.8% Repatha®, 7.4% placebo), and upper respiratory tract infection (5.1% Repatha®, 4.8% placebo).

Among the 16,676 patients without diabetes mellitus at baseline, the incidence of new‐onset diabetes mellitus during the trial was 8.1% in patients assigned to Repatha® compared with 7.7% in those assigned to placebo.

Immunogenicity: Repatha® is a human monoclonal antibody. As with all therapeutic proteins, there is potential for immunogenicity with Repatha®.

Please see full Prescribing Information.