Important Safety Information

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Contraindication: Repatha® is contraindicated in patients with a history of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to Repatha®. Serious hypersensitivity reactions including angioedema have occurred in patients treated with Repatha®.

Allergic Reactions: Hypersensitivity reactions (e.g. angioedema, rash, urticaria) have been reported in patients treated with Repatha®, including some that led to discontinuation of therapy. If signs or symptoms of serious allergic reactions occur, discontinue treatment with Repatha®, treat according to the standard of care, and monitor until signs and symptoms resolve.

Adverse Reactions in Primary Hyperlipidemia (including HeFH): The most common adverse reactions (>5% of patients treated with Repatha® and occurring more frequently than placebo) were: nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection, influenza, back pain, and injection site reactions.

From a pool of the 52‐week trial and seven 12‐week trials: Local injection site reactions occurred in 3.2% and 3.0% of Repatha®‐treated and placebo‐treated patients, respectively. The most common injection site reactions were erythema, pain, and bruising.

Allergic reactions occurred in 5.1% and 4.7% of Repatha®‐treated and placebo‐treated patients, respectively. The most common allergic reactions were rash (1.0% versus 0.5% for Repatha® and placebo, respectively), eczema (0.4% versus 0.2%), erythema (0.4% versus 0.2%), and urticaria (0.4% versus 0.1%).

Adverse Reactions in the Cardiovascular Outcomes Trial: The most common adverse reactions (>5% of patients treated with Repatha® and occurring more frequently than placebo) were: diabetes mellitus (8.8% Repatha®, 8.2% placebo), nasopharyngitis (7.8% Repatha®, 7.4% placebo), and upper respiratory tract infection (5.1% Repatha®, 4.8% placebo).

Among the 16,676 patients without diabetes mellitus at baseline, the incidence of new‐onset diabetes mellitus during the trial was 8.1% in patients assigned to Repatha® compared with 7.7% in those assigned to placebo.

Immunogenicity: Repatha® is a human monoclonal antibody. As with all therapeutic proteins, there is potential for immunogenicity with Repatha®.

Please see full Prescribing Information.

What is PCSK9?

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Why Repatha® Inhibits PCSK9

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How Repatha® Lowers LDL-C Levels

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Using the Pushtronex® System

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Using the SureClick® Autoinjector

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CV Risk Remains: expert Perspectives

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ISSUES IN CARDIOVASCULAR (CV) RISK MANAGEMENT

Gain expert insights on the risk of another MI or stroke in your CVD patients with Harold E. Bays, MD, and Seth J. Baum, MD.

CV Outcomes trial: expert Perspectives

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the repatha® (evolocumab) cv outcomes trial (FOURIER)

Gain expert insights on the Repatha® CV Outcomes Trial (FOURIER) with Harold E. Bays, MD, and Seth J. Baum, MD.

repathaready® insurance support

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RepathaReady® Insurance counselors support services for patients

Helping your patients navigate cost and coverage for Repatha® (evolocumab), counselors are available by phone at 1-844-REPATHA (1-844-737-2842), Monday–Friday, 9 AM–9 PM EST.

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DR. SETH BAUM: Post-hoc Analysis in Patients With Prior MI

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Clinical Challenges in Established Cardiovascular Disease: Second MI

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CLINICAL CHALLENGES IN ESTABLISHED CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE: SECOND MI

Watch a physician-patient scenario featuring Dr. Michael Davidson and a patient with a history of myocardial infarction.

Chapter 1: Presentation

Chapter 2: Treatment Plan

Chapter 3: Clinical Data

Clinical Challenges in Established Cardiovascular Disease: Symptomatic PAD

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Patient case: symptomatic PAD

Watch a physician-patient scenario featuring Dr. Michael Davidson and a patient with peripheral artery disease.

Chapter 1: Presentation

Chapter 2: Treatment Plan

Chapter 3: Access

Chapter 4: Clinical Data

Dr Craig Walker - Post-Hoc Analysis in Patients With Symptomatic PAD

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